Pembroke Welsh Corgi

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The adorable and expressive Pembroke Welsh Corgi… 

It’s easy to see why so many people fall in love with the breed! Why I fell in love with them. Because they’re great dogs! They are big dogs in small packages, fitting into most households with ease and they love German Shepherd. As a companion, the Pembroke knows few equals. A great friend to children, he takes to babysitting like a duck to water.

The Pembroke is an all- around dog, a jack of all trade. He wants to please those he loves and be in their company as much as possible, thriving on being with his special people. While he loves to lie about with his feet up, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi enjoys a challenge and is interested in all aspects of life. Pembroke are adorable and expressive – It’s easy to see why so many people fall in love with the breed! Why I fell in love with them. Because they’re great dogs! They are big dogs in small packages, fitting into most households with ease and they love German Shepherd. As a companion, the Pembroke knows few equals.

A great friend to children, he takes to babysitting like a duck to water. The Pembroke is an all-around dog, a jack of all trades. He wants to please those he loves and be in their company as much as possible, thriving on being with his special people. While he loves to lie about with his feet up, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi enjoys a challenge and is interested in all aspect of life. Pembroke are amenable to training and can become precision workers as long as the trainer is clever enough to make each exercise new and continually interesting.

On her the 18th birthday Queen Elizabeth II, received her first Corgi, called Susan, born in February 1944 at the Cambridgeshire Kennels. The Queen bred Susan and has had at least ten generations of Corgis at the Royal Kennels at Sandringham. They live with the Queen in her private apartments and she cares for the dogs herself as much as possible. Queen Elizabeth II has been a Pembroke fancier all her life and the Windsor Pembroke continue to thrive in the second Elizabeth Age.

The Walt Disney film Little Dog Lost told the story of a Pembroke puppy separated from his family and presented his adventures as he tries to cope on his own. The movie was an adaptation of Meindert de Jong’s book Hurry Home Candy. The canine stars were owned and trained by Doug Bundock of Northern California, and eight different female Pembroke acted the role of Candy, a male Pembroke! However, this was a fact no one seemed to notice. The film was released in 1963 and did much to increase awareness of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi.

The first mention of the Corgi’s being showed was at an agricultural show held in Carmarthenshire, Wales, in 1892, where classes were offered for Curs. It was not until August 1925 that the Royal Welsh Agricultural show held at Carmarthen offered classes for Corgis under official English Kennel Club rules. That year also saw the establishment of the Corgi Club in Wales, with the majority of its membership residing in Pembrokeshire and quite naturally fancying the Pembroke dog. Not to be outdone, the following year the cardigan fanciers formed the Cardigan Welsh Corgi Association to promote their favourite Corgi. The Kennel asked the Corgi Club to change their name to include the word “Welsh”, so it became the Welsh Corgi Club, a club still active today in promoting the best interests of the Pembroke. In 1928, the kennel Club recognized the breed and Challenge Certificates were offered.

The first Corgi champion was made up that same year, she was a red Pembroke bitch named Shan Fach. The first male champion was also a Pembroke, he was named Bonny Gyp. Naturally, the promoters of the Pembroke Corgis didn’t always see eye-to-eye with the supporters of the Cardigan Corgis. The two were recognized as one breed, simply called Corgis. They were registered in the same Stud Book, showed as one breed, judged against each other and included under one breed standard of excellence. In 1934, the Kennel Club granted the two Corgis separate breed status.

Pembroke Welsh Corgis have been used by the Welsh as herding dogs, family companions, and guardians of the farm. They continue today to be workers and companions for their owners. It is believed that their ancestry dates back to at least the tenth century.
They are sensitive and intelligent dogs. They are easily trained as long as training is done with gentle handling and without severe physical correction. They are healthy and long-lived dogs and are excellent companions for either rural or urban families, to training and can become precision workers as long as the trainer is clever enough to make each exercise new and continually interesting.

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